Lucid Dreaming FAQ’s 2017-05-09T11:43:29+00:00

Some questions answered on lucid dreaming

Why have lucid dreams?

They are risk-free, very exciting, valuable tools for growth – and have been used by many cultures including Sufists and the Senoi as a means to understand the world and our place in it. We also spend a third of our lives asleep, so why not make the most of it.

Is lucid dreaming ever dangerous?

Stephen LaBerge has yet to report any side-effects or negative effects of lucid dreaming. If anything, normal dreaming is more disturbing: a nightmare can be frightening and can knock you off balance during the next waking day too. If you can go lucid during the nightmare you can turn to face the chaser, find that he/she was no threat at all, and wake up feeling exhilarated for the rest of the day.

What percentage of the population have experienced lucid dreams?

I’d say about 15% have had them. A British lucid dream expert called Keith Hearne had an article on him and lucid dreaming published in a major national UK newspaper many years ago and based on the resulting correspondence he received he reckoned (if my memory serves me correctly) that 25-30% of the population had had one. I think this is rather high which is why I plum for 15%.
However… I think many people who’ve had them don’t even remember having them! EG: I told my dad all about LDs once, when we first started selling the NovaDreamer and I was having my first lucid dreams with it. He didn’t register at all. then the next day he rang me excitedly: “I’ve just remembered: I used to fly through the air in my dreams as a child and it was real as real. I’d completely forgotten this til now.”

Will the NovaDreamer hinder my sleep?

For me, I found the mask a little unusual at first, but after the first night I felt comfortable wearing it. the device doesn’t hinder my partner either. My wife, Catherine, rarely hears the buzzing during the night if I’ve set the Dream Alarm. I think you will have a similar experience.

How soon will I go lucid after I get the unit?

It took me eight nights to have my first lucid dream. the experience was one of the most profound events of my life. I felt myself fly around the bedroom saying to myself “Yes! I’ve done it!”. It felt absolutely real, but I knew I was dreaming.

Some people have taken two weeks to go lucid. It depends on your eagerness to go lucid.

Does it work for everyone?

Lucid dream expert Stephen LaBerge, the designer of the NovaDreamer, says he has never come across anyone who just couldn’t get lucid. However if you are the type of person who refuses to read manuals or follow instructions then you may be wasting your time, because you’ll be expecting the device to do all the work, and this isn’t possible. For example, an ordinary alarm clock will go off at 7 o’clock in the morning, but it won’t force you to get up – only you can do that! So lucid dreaming takes a little effort – and for that little effort the results are truly extraordinary.

I can’t afford the NovaDreamer right now. What should I do?

Buy the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming now, and the CD Trance Induction of Lucid Dreaming. You could even get the Course too which is very thorough and practical. then when you can afford the NovaDreamer you can deduct the price of these from the price of the NovaDreamer.

Chris Payne

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Press reports about lucid dreaming

The background to lucid dreaming, and more about inventor Stephen LaBerge

Back to NovaDreamer main page


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